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Cycle de conférence hommage à Paul Otlet

Une initiative de Boyd Rayward, premier biographe de Paul Otlet et Professeur à l'Université d'Illinois et de New South Wales (Australie), et d'Eugène Garfield, co-fondateur de la bibliométire et de la scientométrie.

Inaugural Otlet lecture 

By Dr. Paul Duguid

In 1778, Vicesimus Knox—today an all-but forgotten Anglican schoolteacher, but in his time, a popular essayist—declared his era an “Age of Information,” suggesting, in a fashion recognizable today, that the period had severed connections with prior ages and promised rich if daunting futures to those who understood the change. This talk will attempt to set Knox’s claim in context by exploring changes in the way information was understood across the eighteenth century. It will then try to clarify what such a history of information can tell us about our own age.

Speaker Biography

Paul Duguid is an adjunct full professor in the School of Information at the University of California, Berkeley. Over the past decade he has held visiting appointments at Queen Mary, University of London, Copenhagen Business School, and the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris. In the 1990s, he was a consultant to senior management at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). He holds degrees from Washington University (MA) and Bristol University (BA). Paul is co-author with John Seely Brown of The Social Life of Information (2000) and has written extensively on theories of learning and of organization, and on the history of wine and of trademarks. His recent writings look at trademarks from an informational perspective, and at information from a historical perspective. He has been invited to co-edit (with Anthony Grafton and Ann Blair) a multivolume history of information to be published by Princeton University Press. His teaching at Berkeley includes an undergraduate course, “The History of Information,” and a graduate course, “Concepts of Information.” Along with his academic writing, Paul reviewed for the Times Literary Supplement for 25 years, and intermittently for The NationThreepenny Review, and various other publications.

Plus d'information sur l'événement sur le site de l'Université d'Illinois

Revivez la conférence en vidéo!

Lieu: 
University of Illinois, USA

Library & Information science department

Prix: 
Free